The art of fine porcelain ceramics

A few weeks ago, on a foggy February morning I took a drive out to the Kent coastal town of Faversham. Creek Creative part of the towns old brewery building is now home to a collection of artists, designer makers and highly skilled crafts people. My visit was to photograph two of the people that reside in this hotbed of creativity; Rose Dickinson, a ceramic artist and Alex Law, an upholsterer that also designs and prints his own fabrics.

In this post I want share my images of Rose and her work.

Before Christmas I visited Rose to discuss my project documenting designer makers and their work, so I already knew exactly what her studio and workspace was like. Happily by the time I arrived and I started photographing, the mornings fog had lifted and warm sunlight filled her workspace.

Rose’s studio is overflowing with the materials she collects and her work in various stages of completion. I am instantly drawn to what I believe is a piece of art hanging on one of her walls. It looks like a sculpture formed from various items, all kinds of textures and colours from nature. It turns out to be a collection of the things that Rose uses to create and inspire her delicately detailed ceramics. In her own words “you just can’t beat nature!”

Rose’s work is inspired by nature from around the Kentish countryside and marshes near where she lives. Unfortunately I don’t get to see the beginning stages of her creative journey, when she uses natures textures she has found to imprint pieces made from fine porcelain clay. A fresh batch of work is ready to come out of the kiln and after carefully unpacking it, she adds subtle colourful details to each piece before glazing and finally firing again.

Like all the artists and creators I have been visiting, they make what they do appear almost effortless. Piece by piece Rose applies and removes colour, but it is clear by the way she handles her work, this effortlessness is born of years of practice. Once again it’s a wonderful inspiration to see someone’s lifetime of experience coming together as they create something new.

You can see more images from my visit to Rose’s studio on my website here , and more of Rose’s work here

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Thank you for reading this post about Rose and her work, I hope you enjoyed it. It is part of a larger project to document and celebrate designer makers and their work.

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Bold & Colourful Textile Artist

My second visit to document the work of a crafts person takes me to Denmark Hill in South East London and down a rather unassuming alley next to a pub. Behind the gates, past the landlords mass pile of junk and up the stairs of an old and dilapidated warehouse, lies the studio of textile artist Michelle House. Her work combines striking bold and colourful shapes overlaid with abstract photographic images. With careful planning, meticulous mathematical precision and skill that is only achieved from years of practice, she pieces each intricate part of her designs together as screen prints. She creates them all by hand, no mechanical clamps or modern screen printing benches. Each piece is unique. The prints are then either stretched over a frame or the edges are hand stitched to create a wall hanging.

Michelle studied at Goldsmiths College before starting on a full time career as an artist. She has exhibited all over the world, at numerous shows including Collect at the Saatchi Gallery.

I spent the day with Michelle as she was starting to prepare and print three new pieces for an up coming show. Her work can take weeks to complete, depending on the size and complexity. So I will have to return to see how these pieces progress.

One of the reasons I started this project was because of my own experiences at art college and how I had dabbled with all manors of process and techniques for creating art. Observing Michelle as she prepared her canvas and built her designs up, I was taken back to my college days remembering that satisfying feeling as an idea slowly emerged into a fully realised piece of art, very loosely speaking when referring to my college attempts!

I feel very lucky to have been able to gain an insight into how Michelle creates her work. Below are a few images from the day.

Take a look at her website here, and mine; jhyturley.com for more images from the day.

Enjoy.

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The Making of Mickey Mouse Emojis

Way back in May I arranged to meet my good friend Mark Petty and spend the day with him as he worked on a new screen print.

I arrived at a small industrial unit in Peckham Rye, South East London, a little early. The Sonsoles Print Studio is a where Mark creates his art.

Mark arrives, coffee in hand for us both, a good start the day.

I know Mark from our school and college days, both studying graphic design, both working in the advertising industry. But when it come to our personal work we are on separate paths. Apart for now, when my photography will document his art.

My aim for the day was a simple one, document the skill and craft it takes to create a beautiful piece of art.

This is to be the first in a series that will explore and record the Art of Craft, that I hope will come together in a celebration of arty and crafty people.

Anyway, thats enough of my waffling, here is the story of the making of Mickey Mouse Emojis

To see the full set of images please visit my website.

If you have a wall that needs a stunning piece of art visit Mark’s website.

And if you want to screen print your own masterpiece get down to Sonsoles Print Studio.